blue122

 




Photo Album

Key Chicano Moratorium Events
September 16, 1969 to August 29, 1970


To start off our photo section, we want to show a photo each from some of the key developments leading to the mass turnout of August 29, 1970. We will add more on these and much more as our commemoration activities proceed. It is important to know that the term �Chicano Moratorium� represents more than August 29 and that it has a historical trajectory, a legacy that leads up till today.


Refusing Induction

Photo by George Rodriguez

On September 16, 1969, Rosalío Muñoz refused induction joined by over 100 Chicano and peace activists at the Downtown Los Angeles induction/recruitment center.  With fellow activists and growing numbers of others, a Chicano concerted anti-war/anti-draft movement began.

Denver 1969
December 6, 1969 at the Crusade for Justice headquarters in Denver a national meeting of Chicano activists from around the Southwest on the issue of the war and draft. Pictured are Rosal�o Mu�oz, Rams�s Noriega, and Bob Elias of Los Angeles. Puertorique�o activist Sigisfredo Aviles who had just spent two years in prison for refusing induction. Photographer unknown, probably a Crusade for Justice activist.  
1st Chicano Moratorium
December 20, 1969 photo from La Raza magazine of the first Chicano Moratorium held in East Los Angeles, 1500-2000 marched, the Brown Berets initiated the moratorium committee which developed in an all round community group.  
Las Adelitas de Aztlan
February 28, 1970 "March in the Rain" some 5000 Marched through the heart of East Los Angeles in pouring rain. Former women Berets who helped initiate the Chicano Moratorium Committee joined in forming Las Adelitas de Aztl�n, a Chicana women�s action group, pictured here in a photo by La Raza newspaper. A documentary film of this event by the KCET Chicano news program Ahora was acquired by the Chicano Moratorium Committee and shown all over �Aztl�n� to build the Chicano anti-war movement.  
San Francisco Chicano Moratorium
May 31, 1970, a Chicano moratorium in San Francisco�s Mission District was one of over twenty Chicano moratoriums outside of Los Angeles. The first Chicano moratorium outside of Los Angeles was on March 4, 1970 in Fresno. A plan for holding local moratoriums building up to a National Chicano Moratorium on August 29, 1970 was adopted unanimously by over 1500 in attendance at the 2nd Chicano Youth Liberation Conference at the Crusade for Justice headquarters in Denver carrying forward the ideas at the December 6, 1969 meeting.  
 Valley Chicano Moratorium
July 11, 1970 news report of another local moratorium held in the San Fernando Valley with several hundred marching.  
 Moratorium fundraiser
August 8 (?), 1970 Chicano art show to raise funds for the August 29, 1970 national moratorium. Corky Gonzalez attended to show support. Artists Rams�s Noriega, Manuel Cruz and Rudy Salas led the event with other moratorium activists. Many such events were held, picnics, film showings, etc, helped reach out to the grassroots.  
 CalStateLB_MECHA
August 29, 1970 banner of CSULB MEChA group on the August 29 Moratorium march 
LA Times Salazar's Death Coverage 
August 29, 1970 front page of Los Angeles Times after police riot.  

Feb. 28, 1970: 2nd Chicano Moratorium


  

Rosalio Munoz, co-chair of the Chicano Moratorium Committee

David Sanchez,
co-chair of the Chicano Moratorium Committee and Prime Minister of the Brown Berets

Oscar Zeta
was a well-known Chicano Attorney that represented the "LA 13" among other Chicano activists during the Chicano Movement.

Alicia Escalante,
head of the Chicana Welfare Rights Organization

Las Adelitas de Aztlan
Women from "Las Adelitas de Aztlan"

This was the East L.A Free Clinic founded by the Brown Berets Organization that was headed by the Minister of Correspondence & Finance, Gloria Arellanes.

Feb. 28, 2010 Event: Bring the Troops Home

02
Don_t
Don_t
More Coming Soon



[Home] [About Us] [Contribute] [Moratorium Participants] [Photo Albums] [History Timeline] [History Writings] [Get Involved] [Contact Us]